Summer for Small Business

This summer has been hot.  With many days climbing into the upper 80’s and 90’s, it’s hard to find motivation to accomplish any amount of work.  All you want to do is hop in the pool, or sit on your couch with a fan.  It can even be hard to run a business in this heat.  Customers may not want to walk or drive to your store to avoid the heat.  Your employees may lose productivity as they take vacations or simply daydream about being outside in the fresh air.

However, you can still improve your business in the summer months.  Here are four ideas to help you keep your business running smoothly when even the air conditioning is struggling.

  1. Take advantage of “rainy days”.

I know many people still use the adage “I’ll save it for a rainy day.”  Generally this means they’re saving some money for when it’s tight, but it also means sometime when a job can be accomplished.  Luckily for us, this summer has brought many rainy days to accomplish tasks.  However, you don’t need to watch the sky to know if it’s a rainy day.  A rainy day can be any time that you can accomplish a task.  Is your business often quiet before 10 am?  Then schedule some time in the morning to work on that bookwork that’s been piling up.  Do five people call on Tuesdays compared to 20 the rest of the week?  If so, start using that day to update your client profiles.  “Rainy days” can happen at any time.

  1. Make sure all your systems are running smoothly.

This one is especially true if your business involves a lot of outside work or has many pieces of equipment.  The summer months are the best time to fix anything that may be broken on your office building or within your machinery.  Take this one from me as I have had to set fence posts into the cold ground on Christmas Day and also demolish a building in mid-May.  I would much rather demolish buildings all summer then set one fence post in December.  Your employees will thank you if you accomplish outside tasks during the warm summer months.

  1. Plan an employee or customer appreciation night.

This one can help you express your gratitude to loyal employees and customers.  Rent a park, picnic shelter, or even just offer up your house one night (assuming it can hold all your employees).  Your customers will appreciate the gesture, and it can help build comradery between your employees.  It can also be cheap, especially if it’s an outdoor employee potluck or barbeque.

  1. Take a class

This is a page right out of your college handbook.  If you get behind on your degree, take summer courses.  Running a business is no different.  If you’ve been running your business for a long time, taking a class that is focused on your business can give you new perspective on how to attract customers, create marketing schemes, or simply get you up to date with new rules and regulations.  There are many classes for business owners offered in the summer months.  If you are interested in this, check out www.iowasbdc.org/workshop-calendar/ for different classes, workshops, and seminars offered around the state of Iowa.

Studying vs. Learning in Entrepreneurship

Students.  The children, teens, and young adults out there in the world trying to learn as much as they can in order to succeed in life.  As I am currently one of these, I can say that studying and learning is my job.  As I write this post, I am well aware of the fact that I have three to four hours of homework waiting for me at home, and I can’t say I’m excited about that fact.  Some business owners may understand my pain as you have piles of bookwork stashed away to be tackled when you have time.

But this blog isn’t for the people who already have a business started.  It’s for all of the people who are reading this, hoping to gain more information on how to be a business owner so they can become one too.  You’re doing your homework, so to speak.  Reading entrepreneurship articles for hours, trying to understand as many concepts as you can to ensure that your vision can come to fruition.

I realize that I’m still a student with very little “real world experience”, but I can say that I understand homework and studying.  It’s tedious, your hand cramps as you write yet another research essay, and you can’t cram any more accounting information into your head.  Studying is legal torture, and you cannot convince me otherwise.

I’ve also heard that you never stop learning.  But I’m beginning to realize that we have confused studying and learning.  Many students study for hours to simply regurgitate what they memorized onto a test, and then forget it immediately after.  They haven’t really learned anything, just passed the test.  Most of you are probably wondering what this has to do with business, but I’m not just talking about formal education here.  Many people have goals and visions for a future company.  They spend hours researching on sites like Forbes, Entrepreneur, and The Wall Street Journal hoping to eventually figure out exactly how they should put this idea into action.  They study, and while this isn’t bad, it’s not learning.

Growing up on a farm, I never studied how to check cattle.  There was never a website that I logged onto to figure out how to unlatch a gate, or read a magazine article on how to carry a hay bale.  But I learned a lot.  It was informal, and often painful as I would get kicked or stepped on, but I learned a lot about how to properly handle an animal and farm work that I couldn’t have learned through a book.

One Entrepreneur article says that many people have the knowledge to become business owners, they have studied so much that they have “information overload” and don’t know where to go.  They haven’t turned their hours of studying into learning.  The article goes on to encourage aspiring business owners to take action, and start the business.  You can’t fail if you never start, but you can’t succeed either.

I doubt that most of you will have to worry about stampeding cows if you open your business, but there are other things that will be difficult.  You may struggle finding loans, creating a customer base, or marketing your product.  However, I would have never learned how to jump over a fence if I never had the cattle in the first place.  Maybe it’s time for you stop studying entrepreneurship, and start learning about entrepreneurship.

If you’re ready to take the next step but are still uncertain on exactly where to go, the Iowa SBDC is here to help.  Visit http://iowasbdc.org/ to schedule your free and confidential advising appointment.