Studying vs. Learning in Entrepreneurship

Students.  The children, teens, and young adults out there in the world trying to learn as much as they can in order to succeed in life.  As I am currently one of these, I can say that studying and learning is my job.  As I write this post, I am well aware of the fact that I have three to four hours of homework waiting for me at home, and I can’t say I’m excited about that fact.  Some business owners may understand my pain as you have piles of bookwork stashed away to be tackled when you have time.

But this blog isn’t for the people who already have a business started.  It’s for all of the people who are reading this, hoping to gain more information on how to be a business owner so they can become one too.  You’re doing your homework, so to speak.  Reading entrepreneurship articles for hours, trying to understand as many concepts as you can to ensure that your vision can come to fruition.

I realize that I’m still a student with very little “real world experience”, but I can say that I understand homework and studying.  It’s tedious, your hand cramps as you write yet another research essay, and you can’t cram any more accounting information into your head.  Studying is legal torture, and you cannot convince me otherwise.

I’ve also heard that you never stop learning.  But I’m beginning to realize that we have confused studying and learning.  Many students study for hours to simply regurgitate what they memorized onto a test, and then forget it immediately after.  They haven’t really learned anything, just passed the test.  Most of you are probably wondering what this has to do with business, but I’m not just talking about formal education here.  Many people have goals and visions for a future company.  They spend hours researching on sites like Forbes, Entrepreneur, and The Wall Street Journal hoping to eventually figure out exactly how they should put this idea into action.  They study, and while this isn’t bad, it’s not learning.

Growing up on a farm, I never studied how to check cattle.  There was never a website that I logged onto to figure out how to unlatch a gate, or read a magazine article on how to carry a hay bale.  But I learned a lot.  It was informal, and often painful as I would get kicked or stepped on, but I learned a lot about how to properly handle an animal and farm work that I couldn’t have learned through a book.

One Entrepreneur article says that many people have the knowledge to become business owners, they have studied so much that they have “information overload” and don’t know where to go.  They haven’t turned their hours of studying into learning.  The article goes on to encourage aspiring business owners to take action, and start the business.  You can’t fail if you never start, but you can’t succeed either.

I doubt that most of you will have to worry about stampeding cows if you open your business, but there are other things that will be difficult.  You may struggle finding loans, creating a customer base, or marketing your product.  However, I would have never learned how to jump over a fence if I never had the cattle in the first place.  Maybe it’s time for you stop studying entrepreneurship, and start learning about entrepreneurship.

If you’re ready to take the next step but are still uncertain on exactly where to go, the Iowa SBDC is here to help.  Visit / to schedule your free and confidential advising appointment.

 

America’s SBDC Iowa: Who We Are, What We Do

America’s SBDC Iowa has been providing quality business counseling for small business owners and entrepreneurs since 1981. Still, many are unaware of the services we provide, and the benefits that clients experience. If you are unsure about receiving counseling from the Iowa SBDC, read on.

Our Mission

To support the collaborative economic development of Iowa by providing entrepreneurs and businesses with individual consultation and educational resources necessary to assist their businesses to succeed.

Brief history

The history of the SBDC can be traced back as far as the 1940’s, when some of the first University-based extension services were presented in legislation. However, it wasn’t until 1976 that the University Business Development Center, the first incarnation of the SBDC, was established at the California State Polytechnic University in Pomona, CA. By 1979, the network had 16 participants, including universities in Minnesota, Nebraska, and Missouri. Then, in 1980, President Carter signed the SBDC network into law with the Small Business Development Act. The Iowa SBDC was established in 1981, as one of the first 20 centers added to the network.

For more on the history of the SBDC, click here

Overview of services

The Small Business Development Center was created to educate and support small business owners across the country through no-cost counseling. Because of the emphasis on client education, the SBDC program has been the largest and most successful technical assistance program the federal government has provided for small businesses. We provide consulting in the most vital areas of your business, including:

  • Business planning
  • Market research
  • Capital infusion
  • Legal requirements
  • Exit strategies

SBDC counselors bring years of experience in a variety of industries, and many of them have owned small businesses of their own. This helps them see things from the perspective of the business owner. Additionally, they can draw on their personal experience to help business owners and entrepreneurs avoid pitfalls that they may not see coming.

For more on the services provided by the Iowa SBDC, click here

Impact

The Iowa SBDC has consistently provided a significant positive impact on small business since 1981. In 2017, the SBDC impacted Iowa in the following way:

  • 293 New business starts
  • 1,845 Iowa jobs created
  • 4,044 clients counseled
  • $108,668,237 in capital infusion
  • $111,807,427 in increased sales

For more on the impact of the Iowa SBDC, click here

 

Testimonials

Clients have a lot to say about the SBDC. Here are some words of praise from Iowa small business owners just like yourself:

“Having access to the resources to help turn our idea into a business was a vital part that got us where we are today. How much interest the SBDC has in every business just goes to show how much they care and want us to succeed, which means a lot.” – Mikayla Sullivan, Kinosol SBC (Ames)

“We always met wherever and whenever. Communication was always great. They helped me with 3 year projections before I purchased the business. Within a short amount of time, they were able to help me with the foundation of the business. I don’t know if we would even be in business without the help of the SBDC.” – Theo Ramsey, Ramsey’s Market (Lenox)

“The SBDC is a great asset to rural communities that need help to build businesses in their communities.”- Jessica Kannegieter, Mud on Main Coffee Shop, Café & Roastery (Aurelia and Cherokee)

“The SBDC is a great resource to help put together a loan application and financial projections for securing a bank loan. They are there to answer questions and to bounce ideas off of, and are not afraid to ask you (the owner) tough questions to make you think about your business decisions.”- Terry Schnack, C.A.R.S. (West Burlington)

For success stories about the business above, and many, many more, click here

Whether you have a new business idea and don’t know where to start, or are an established business looking to grow, America’s SBDC Iowa has the expertise and resources you need to find success. Contact us today to schedule your first session, and just see how far you can go!

To request counseling from America’s SBDC Iowa, click here